Terrible People, Part 3: #Hashtaggers

#Annoying.

This blog post has been brought to you by the hashtag, otherwise known as the most annoying Internet trend of the 21st century.

It started on Twitter, as a way of linking posts on common topics. I heard about it then, and thought “gee, that could get annoying,” even though it did serve a purpose. (I do not have a Twitter account, that being one of the reasons). But then, it shifted over to Facebook. And now real life, from advertising to clothing to everyday speech.

And I’ve had just enough of seeing and hearing it everywhere.

It’s lost its original purpose. Now, a hashtag is just an excuse for someone to say more unnecessary things, because we live in a world where everyone a) talks too much, and b) doesn’t value or understand the meaning of silence. Take a break once in awhile, people. You’re not that great, and your multiple hashtagged Facebook posts aren’t helping anyone or anything; they’re just cries for the attention that you probably don’t deserve. You could say the same pointless thing with words with capitalization, punctuation, and correct spelling soidonthavetospendtenminutesfiguringoutwhatthehellyouretalkingabout.

I know it sounds a bit harsh, but here are some of the more ridiculous hashtags that have popped up on my Facebook feed in the recent past (as in the past three hours, capitalization provided for emphasis):

#LevelUp

#CantTouchThisDananana

#TenStaples

#AfternoonWalk

#CrossingTheLake

#TinyBallerinas

#TheResemblanceIsUncanny

#WhereDoWeCashIn

#MaybeDukeNeedsAGirlfriend

#SpookyFaggots

#AiportSwag [sic]

#FlexForChrist (seriously?!?!)

And the absolute worst…

Drumroll please…

The people who hashtag THEIR OWN NAMES.

I really, really wish I was kidding. But I’m not. So far I’ve seen two people do this. The first, a girl hashtagging her rap name to promote her new album, is more on the understandable side but still not quite there. The second person is a guy who hashtags his own name, among a sea of other random hashtags, several times a day. I’m pretty sure that he’s single, but deeply in love with himself.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is what humanity has come to in 2015.

You, sir, are a Terrible Person.

No, not a #terribleperson, but an actual Terrible Person.

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27 thoughts on “Terrible People, Part 3: #Hashtaggers

  1. I have the same feelings! I don’t have twitter account. The only way I use hashtags is in instagram as a form of tagging like you tag posts on wordpress for people to find posts about those subjects. I think the worse is when people use them in actual speech. Ugh.
    I loved this “Now, a hashtag is just an excuse for someone to say more unnecessary things, “

  2. True! I get annoyed when people use hashtag in every single word they type. #i #cannot #understand #them. Annoying right?
    I also heard celebrities using hashtag in their actual speech. And I was like… WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THIS WORLD?
    I have twitter but I don’t use hashtag so much.

  3. Ok, I have a Twitter account and I do occasionally do hashtags in my tweets. But I’m a sensible hashtagger. Like, if I’m watching a show that I know lots of other people will be watching, I’ll hashtag so I can connect and maybe have a chat about the show with other viewers. But those people who hashtag EVERYTHING really get on my nerves. There’s this one guy who tweets me sometimes who will hashtag everything. Once he sent me a tweet with five hashtags in it, and I thought, #lifeisnotahashtagbro.

    But what really gets me is those people who try to turn their child’s name into a hashtag. Then I think, #yourechildisnotahashtag.

    Ugh.

  4. Good lord I’m older than I thought. I live in a cave and don’t get out much. No Twitter, no FaceBook. I do Instagram, but my world is small. Is hash-tagging a high-five in cyberspace? Next time I’m at the senior center I’m going to take a poll. 😉

    • It’s like a high-five, if the high five came with bumper sticker that stuck to your hand for the rest of the day. From: That’s So Jacob To: jacobh1021@yahoo.com Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2015 12:21 AM Subject: [That’s So Jacob] Comment: “Terrible People, Part 2: #Hashtaggers” #yiv9480027384 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv9480027384 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv9480027384 a.yiv9480027384primaryactionlink:link, #yiv9480027384 a.yiv9480027384primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv9480027384 a.yiv9480027384primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv9480027384 a.yiv9480027384primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv9480027384 WordPress.com | | |

  5. The overuse of hashtags is, to me, but a small symptom of the general malaise born of and encouraged by social media. You hit on it well, when you said “everyone a) talks too much, and b) doesn’t value or understand the meaning of silence.” I would rephrase that as “everyone a) talks too much, b) actually says very little, and c) doesn’t value or understand the meaning of silence.”

  6. Love your blog post. Written hashtags are bad enough, but man-oh-man do I hate it when people verbally hashtag. I’m old (61) and I admit I simply don’t understand hashtags.

  7. So you think you created something useful. Turns out it was bull!
    Case in point : Hashtag!
    Your post, however? Freaking awesome!

    Or should I say #FreakingAwesome? 😉

  8. Hashtags are such a great way to connect with people posting about the same things as you on Instagram or Twitter but let’s be honest, people just love to overdo everything!

  9. I use them for instagram, but just the actual words that link to whatever photo I post! What I don’t understand is when people hashtag an entire sentence that no one will ever hashtag again… such as #ijustateabagelandnowimgoingtosleep
    What is the point?!
    Thanks for the post haha

  10. Thanks for the follow and comment!

    #OMG I so agree with you on this #trend. It’s so #like annoying #? Like finishing sentences with question marks to simulate that annoying habit of ending every sentence with a lift, so it sounds like a question?

    Funny when they get mixed up though. Lots of kids in USA use #irl meaning “in real life” such as “Where are you now #irl”

    When Ireland plays football or rugby matches, or sings in the Eurovision we use #IRL to follow tweets about the team. Some of the crossovers can be funny. Especially when during Eurovision if you applied #irl to a commment the Irish Flag came up on your tweet.

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