All Eyes On Me In The Center Of The Ring Just Like A…

Greetings again from Charlotte, y’all. It was a beautiful day today, and it’s supposed to be rainy tomorrow which is no bueno because I still have 8 geocaches to find before the big 2200.

I brought a ton of books along on this trip. I always bring way too many, but I actually started and finished one on the plane from Madison to Charlotte: After the Circus, by Patrick Modiano.

Modiano is a French writer who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2014, and with that knowledge, I saw this newly-translated book on a shelf in the library and thought that it might be interesting. It’s a quick read; over a hundred pages but it went by so fast that when I finished, I had no idea if I had even started. We don’t learn the protagonist’s name until two-thirds of the way through the book, but everything about this book seems to be on a need-to-know basis; we meet the two main characters as they meet each other, while they are giving testimonies at a local police station in Paris. The mystery thickens when she (Gisele) has him pose as her brother, for some sort of plan, and then there turns out to be a plan within the plan, and so on. As a reader, you don’t really find out what happens, but there’s subterfuge and adventure, vague as it is.

Appropriately, the one article I found written on After the Circus, written by Ann L. Murphy, is entitled “Confusion in the Service of Clarity: The Circus in Patrick Modiano’s Une cirque passe.” Confusion seems to resonate with this one. Murphy concludes that we learn something, but don’t necessarily move too far forward, and I can see that – something like, there was change, and now things are different in a way, but your interpretation may vary.

This book review has been brought to you by: my feeling of accomplishment. Good job, me.


Works Cited:

Modiano, Patrick. After the Circus. Trans. Mark Polizzotti. New Haven: Yale UP, 2015. Print.

Murphy, Ann L. “Confusion in the Service of Clarity: The Circus in Patrick Modiano’s Une cirque passe.” Romance Notes 45.2 (January 2005): 171-180. MLA International Bibliography. EBSCO. Web. Accessed 28 May 2016.

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